Urban form shapes personal experiences: A comparison of parks in Denver and Boston

Originally posted on On the rapid urbanization of Asian cities and Built Environment in the U.S.:

When I lived in Denver, visiting city parks were a big part of my life – having picnics near the Pavilion at Cheesman, jogging around Wash Park, and listening to jazz at City Park. People who visited me frequently commented that Denver has the most beautiful parks, and wished their city would have such nice parks. Growing up near Boston, my park experiences were equally exceptional but different. I recall the experience of ascending from the Boylston T stop into the Public Gardens and Boston Commons, among the oldest public spaces in the nation. When I got older I began biking around the Charles River, stopping at Harvard Square in Cambridge for lunch followed by a ride around Fenway Park. My park experiences in the two cities were so drastically different that I question why. Was it the density of buildings and people? Was it the location of the parks…

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Agriculture Started in West Asia 23,000 Years Ago?

Researchers believe agriculture was “invented” some 10-12,000 years ago in the Cradle of Civilization — Iraq, the Levant, parts of Turkey and Iran — an area that was home to some of the earliest known human civilizations. A new discovery by an international collaboration of researchers from Tel Aviv University, Harvard University, Bar-Ilan University, and the University of Haifa raises questions and suggests that trial plant cultivation began far earlier — some 23,000 years ago.The study focuses on the discovery of the first weed species at the site of a sedentary human camp on the shore of the Sea of Galilee.

read here

and see here

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eBasta – Special Online Platform for School Students

Guest Post by Mohit Chabria

Many school students are frustrated because of the increasing load of their school bag. Now frustration of school students is going to reduce as eBasta has got launched. School students will be able to go through eBook version of their school books easily by making use of eBasta. If you’re a parent then you must definitely try to check out eBasta and also make your child use it for reading school books.

 School Books By Different Publishers

eBasta is going to make school students happy as eBook version of not only the important school books, but also the eBook version of books published by different publishers is going to be available at eBasta. It is expected that even many books which can provide knowledge and other related eBooks for students will get available at eBasta.

 Finding Required eBooks is going to be Easy for Students

One of the problems students may face at an online platform is that they may not be able to find required school books easily. It is eBasta which provides special option to teachers and parents to create eBasta for students. The eBasta created for students studying in a particular class will include all the books that can be useful for them. As students will be easily able to find the required books at eBasta, they may definitely love to make use of eBasta regularly.

Special Study Material for Students

Various teachers, publishers etc will be allowed to add useful study material easily at eBasta. I hope that students too will be able to share important study notes with each other by making use of the new platform eBasta.

Android App for Students

Students making use of an Android smartphone or tablet will be able to download eBasta App. This App will allow them to easily read the eBastas downloaded by them. Soon eBasta App may get available for iOS, Windows and other platforms which shall make students become more happy.

eBasta initiative by the Government is going to be liked by students, teachers and also parents. It is important that school students should get the best type of facility so that they will be able to study easily. Do share your opinion about eBasta and also let me know that whether you have yourself tried to read books at eBasta.

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Mare Magnum: Urbanization of the sea

Originally posted on MACHINES OF URBANIZATION:

First presented as part of a panel, Territory beyond Terra, with Phil Steinberg, Elaine Stratford and Kimberly Peters at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) 2015, Chicago

To speak of urbanizing the sea may conjure up images of the empty mansions dotting palm-shaped islands in Dubai, or the ongoing expansion of Monaco’s territory into the Ligurian Sea, or it may remind us of the pretensions of Nigeria’s new ‘Eko Atlantic’ project. It may also recall cartographies of resource extraction and circulation across the seabed: the ‘extended urbanization’ (Brenner/Lefebvre) using the ocean to wrap the planet with infrastructural continuity. It may also recall utopian projects of the 60’s in which floating cities were imagined as great interconnected web-like arks colonizing the ocean’s placid grey surface. While these imaginations are relevant, I would like to move beyond the immediacy such images impose, considering instead what it could mean to speak of the…

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“City Smell” Mappers Want Urban Planners to Use Their Noses

Originally posted on The Urban Sustainability Lab:

Jenn Stanley
Next City
June 8, 2015

This “smell map” of London shows emission odors in red and natural scents in green. (Credit: Daniele Quercia, Rossano Schifanella, Luca Maria Aiello, and Kate McLean)

There are many ways to map a city: a basic street map, a neighborhood breakdown, by demographics. Now, thanks to researchers from the academic and technology worlds (Yahoo), we have something a bit different: the smell map.

The authors of “Smelly Maps: The Digital Life of Urban Smellscapes” used their own noses, crowdsourcing and social media to create odor-centric maps of cities.

According to the Washington Post:

Smell is hard to record, analyze and depict visually. So to make these maps, the researchers first created what they call a “smell dictionary” with the help of volunteers around the world. They asked dozens of residents in seven cities in Europe and the U.S. — Amsterdam, Pamplona, Glasgow, Edinburgh…

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How can cultural geography help energy policy makers? (link)

In an interesting post on AUSCCER blog the relationship is explained here.

The theoretical and methodological approaches of cultural geography may help inform energy policy initiatives by providing insights to how people live with the arrival of winter cold in different places. Attention turns to how certain warming practices are sensed and make sense in the context of the different social and material relationships that comprise homes. Cultural geographers bring to the fore the importance of cultural norms of domestic heat management, the relationship between domestic warming practices and how people think of themselves, the energy implications of ideals of domesticity and the varied winter warming skills of households. Less attention has been paid to how narratives of adapting to winter cold help constitute geographical differences.he theoretical and methodological approaches of cultural geography may help inform energy policy initiatives by providing insights to how people live with the arrival of winter cold in different places. Attention turns to how certain warming practices are sensed and make sense in the context of the different social and material relationships that comprise homes. Cultural geographers bring to the fore the importance of cultural norms of domestic heat management, the relationship between domestic warming practices and how people think of themselves, the energy implications of ideals of domesticity and the varied winter warming skills of households. Less attention has been paid to how narratives of adapting to winter cold help constitute geographical differences.

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