The New Urbanism: Fast, Nimble, Flexible, and Tactical

New Urbanism is an approach based on the principles of how cities and towns had been built for the last several centuries: walkable blocks and streets, housing and shopping in close proximity, and accessible public spaces. New Urbanism focuses on human-oriented urban design.

Connectivity has a vital role in New Urbanism as the basic concept is walkability.  

The principles are developed to offer alternative to the sprawling, single-use, low-density patterns typical of post-WWII development, which have been shown to inflict negative economic, health, and environmental impacts on communities.

New Urbanists want to see those human-scale neighborhoods to return 

Uncovering the production process of social life in urban spatial settings is one of the essentials in the development of modern urban planning and design (Lefebvre 1991). Spatial structure refers to a set of spatial relationships arising out of the urban form and its underlying interaction between various urban entities (Anas et al. 1998). Urban Fabric is a vital component of urban planning.

New Urbanists make placemaking and Democratic Public Space a High Priority

Democratic public space involves complex relationships between ownership, agency, occupation,  control, and freedom. It is intertwined with Concept of  Social Space and Geographical Space as well.

New Urbanism is Pragmatic, Flexible and Tactical

New Urbanism is focused on Design

Urban design is the art of creating and shaping cities and towns. It involves the arrangement and design of buildings, public spaces, transport systems, services, and amenities. It is the process of giving form, shape, and character to groups of buildings, to whole neighbourhoods, and the city. It is a framework that orders the elements into a network of streets, squares, and blocks. Urban design blends architecture, landscape architecture, and city planning together to make urban areas functional and attractive. Urban Design Reflects Past and Future of Cities.

Urban design is the art of creating and shaping cities and towns. It involves the arrangement and design of buildings, public spaces, transport systems, services, and amenities. It is the process of giving form, shape, and character to groups of buildings, to whole neighbourhoods, and the city. It is a framework that orders the elements into a network of streets, squares, and blocks. Urban design blends architecture, landscape architecture, and city planning together to make urban areas functional and attractive.

New Urbanism is an urban design movement which promotes environmentally friendly living by creating walkable neighborhoods . It arose in the United States in the early 1980s, and has gradually influenced many aspects of real estate development, urban planning, and municipal land-use strategies. New urbanism attempts to address the ills associated with urban sprawl and post-Second World War suburban development

New Urbanism is Critical to the Function of Communities

Interactions among inhabitants, as well as a sense of community, will be strengthened by a proper organisation of space. The functioning of communities can be stimulated by passive social contact and by the physical proximity of people. In New Urbanism. a space is designed in a specific way, to make such contacts possible.

New Urbanism is Holistic

New Urbanism encompasses all structures from the metropolitan region to the single building. A building that is connected to a transit stop will help the region function better, and well-organized region benefits the buildings within it. All components of the built environment must work together to create great places.

Reclaiming underutilized and neglected Space is focus of New Urban Design and building

Cities are often identified by city dwellers by old historic buildings. New Urbanism protects and restore these historic buildings.

New Urbanism is about creating sustainable, human-scaled places where people can live healthy and happy lives to create Sustainable Cities

The overall objective of New Urbanism is to improve the quality of life for the residents in communities and neighborhoods. Environmental protection and urban planning in a sustainable way is the future of planning towns and cities all over the world.

Link(s) and Source(s):

CNU

Planning Tank

Making a City: Politics, Power and Democracy

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A lesson in political theory from farmers’ unions

KAFILA - COLLECTIVE EXPLORATIONS SINCE 2006

A little bemused, I heard a writer addressing the farmers’ protests recently say in all solidarity and sincerity – “What we have been writing about for long, you have demonstrated at ground level.”

On the contrary, I believe that this massive and electrifying protest against the farm laws is at the cutting edge of political theory and political practice, from which writers and academics must listen and learn.

Please listen to the statement by Kanwaljeet Singh on the Supreme Court judgement staying the farm laws, and setting up an “expert” committee to “negotiate” between the farmers and the government.

Speaking on behalf of the joint forum of farmers’ unions, Kisan Ekta Morcha, Kanwaljeet (of Punjab Kisan Union) makes what I think are two critical points regarding the law and how movements can relate to it. These thought provoking points have larger resonance and require wide ranging debate and consideration.

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New Ruralism: Solutions for Struggling Small Towns

THE DIRT

Screamin Ridge farm, Vermont / Screamin Ridge

New Urbanism is a well-known movement that aims to create more walkable communities. Less known is New Ruralism, which is focused on the preservation and enhancement of rural communities beyond the edge of metropolitan regions. Small towns now part of this nascent movement seek to define themselves on their own terms, not just in relation to nearby cities. These towns are more than “just food sheds for metro areas,” explained Peg Hough, Vermont, planner and environmental advocate with Community-resilience.org, at the American Planning Association (APA) annual conference in New York City. Representatives from three northeastern states — Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire — explained how the principles of New Ruralism can help suffering communities.

In many struggling small northeastern rural towns, the drug epidemic has ravaged communities already weakened by the loss of manufacturing jobs. But it’s clear there are also…

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The Triumph of the Urban, Gentrification and Sprawl – Robert Bruegmann

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