Day-Trippers and Domestic Tourism

A day-tripper is a visitor whose length of stay at a destination does not include an overnight at either a collective tourism establishment (e.g., hotels, camping sites) or in a private one (e.g., staying with friends or relatives). A day-tripper is also referred to as an excursionist or same-day visitor

While domestic tourism could be seen as less glamorous and dramatic than international traffic flows, it has been more important to more people over a longer period. Key phases in the pioneering development of tourism as a commercial phenomenon in Britain were driven by domestic demand and local journeys.

In an asian country like India domestic tourism is a vital part of tourism mix. The tourism industry is has emerged as one of the fastest-growing industries in the world and economically important for rapid growth for Asia. 

The World Tourism Organization, which tries to count tourists globally, is more concerned with the international scene, but across the globe, and perhaps especially in Asia, domestic tourism remains much more important in numerical terms than the international version. Relationship between culture and tourism is increasing and Asia is an interesting region to be in this regard.

European wars in the late 18th and early 19th centuries prompted the “discovery of Britain” and the rise of the Lake District and Scottish Highlands as destinations for both the upper classes and the aspiring classes. Scotland has many domestic tourist from London and other parts of UK.

The railways helped to open the seaside to working-class day-trippers and holidaymakers, especially in the last quarter of the 19th century. By 1914  Blackpool in Lancashire, the world’s first working-class seaside resort, had around four million visitors per summer. Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, had more visitors by this time, but most were day-trippers who came from and returned to locations elsewhere in the New York City area by train the same day. Domestic tourism is less visible in statistical terms and tends to be serviced by regional, local, and small family-run enterprises.

Source(s):

Britannica

The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism

About Rashid Faridi

I am Rashid Aziz Faridi ,Writer, Teacher and a Voracious Reader.
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