Human Settlement Development,Highways and India

A settlement is an existence of occupancy for shelter where people live. Settlement is man’s structural transformation towards application to his environment.The study of settlements is largely a product of the twentieth century. A settlement is man’s first step towards adaptation to his environment. Settlement designates an organised colony of human beings, together with their residences and other buildings (shops, hotels, banks etc.), the roads, streets which are used for travel. Settlements are located as advantageously as possible with respect to natural features such as water, fuel, food, protection and drainage and access to transportation and communication.

Human Settlement Development is responsible to facilitate, promote, co-ordinate and manage integrated human settlements, emergency housing, and upgrading of informal settlements. Good transport facilities like highways help in this up gradation.

            Highways work as life lines for the country or the region in which they are located. So, naturally, they have tremendous impact on the settlements located along them. In some cases, the highways are the very ‘raison d’etre’ of the settlement. Precisely these are the reasons of selecting area along Grand Trunk Road for this particular study. Being an old and historic road and being an important highway, Grand Trunk Road has an overwhelming influence on the patterns of settlement located along its course. The settlements along Grand Trunk Road are mainly of linear and rectangular pattern. Checkerboard and amorphous patterns are also found as a result of continuous growth.

Good settlement planning is necessary for a sustainable future of the world. Planning for future needs analysis of past trends, prospects and projection of growth and decay.  Involvement of experts, as well as people, should be sought to develop a model and for this purpose a comprehensive database is a must. This study tries to do that. An attempt has been made to prepare a wide ranging database for the planners and policy makers.

          The importance of transport is essentially felt in a large country like India with diverse people speaking a number of languages. There are innumerable modes of transport and roads hold a place of pride amongst them. They are flexible, feasible, efficient and cost effective. Flexibility is the hallmark of a good road-network. Economic feasibility often tips the balance in favour of road development first and foremost.

          Grand Trunk Road is like a river of life to this country, in the old, old days, when Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq, Sultan of Delhi streamlined the country’s roads, bullock-carts and camel caravans were the chief transporters. In 1333, when Moroccan traveller Ibne Battuta visited India, he was deeply impressed by the Sultan’s road network. Sher Shah Suri, who ruled from 1540 till 1545, made further improvements, especially to the Grand Trunk Road. He built caravanserais and inns for travellers, and planted fine trees along it and other important highways.

          When the British consolidated their power in India, they found the Grand Trunk Road, stretching as it did from Calcutta to Peshawar, a great line of communication. Due to its importance it touched the life of people residing along its course and in neighbouring area in many ways. It has a tremendous impact over the settlement patterns in the areas it traverses.

Human Settlement Development is responsible to facilitate, promote, co-ordinate and manage integrated human settlements, emergency housing, and upgrading of informal settlements. Good transport facilities like highways help in this up gradation.

          The importance of transport is essentially felt in a large country like India with diverse people speaking a number of languages. There are innumerable modes of transport and roads hold a place of pride amongst them. They are flexible, feasible, efficient and cost effective. Flexibility is the hallmark of a good road-network. Economic feasibility often tips the balance in favour of road development first and foremost.

          Grand Trunk Road is like a river of life to this country, in the old, old days, when Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq, Sultan of Delhi streamlined the country’s roads, bullock-carts and camel caravans were the chief transporters. In 1333, when Moroccan traveller Ibne Battuta visited India, he was deeply impressed by the Sultan’s road network. Sher Shah Suri, who ruled from 1540 till 1545, made further improvements, especially to the Grand Trunk Road. He built caravanserais and inns for travellers, and planted fine trees along it and other important highways.

          When the British consolidated their power in India, they found the Grand Trunk Road, stretching as it did from Calcutta to Peshawar, a great line of communication. Due to its importance it touched the life of people residing along its course and in neighbouring area in many ways. It has a tremendous impact over the settlement patterns in the areas it traverses.

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About Rashid Faridi

I am Rashid Aziz Faridi ,Writer, Teacher and a Voracious Reader.
This entry was posted in Human Geography, India, Infrastructure, opinions and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Human Settlement Development,Highways and India

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