Histograms

In statistics, a histogram is a graphical display of tabulated frequencies. A histogram is the graphical version of a table that shows what proportion of cases fall into each of several or many specified categories. The histogram differs from a bar chart in that it is the area of the bar that denotes the value, not the height, a crucial distinction when the categories are not of uniform width (Lancaster, 1974). The categories are usually specified as non-overlapping intervals of some variable. The categories (bars) in bar chart must be adjacent.They are not separated in histogram.

The word histogram is derived from Greek: histos ‘anything set upright’ (as the masts of a ship, the bar of a loom, or the vertical bars of a histogram); gramma ‘drawing, record, writing’. The histogram is one of the seven basic tools of quality control, which also include the Pareto chart, check sheet, control chart, cause-and-effect diagram, flowchart, and scatter diagram. A generalization of the histogram is kernel smoothing techniques. This will construct a very smooth Probability density function from the supplied data.

Climograph

Bar Diagram

Pie Chart

Scales

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About Rashid Faridi

I am Rashid Aziz Faridi ,Writer, Teacher and a Voracious Reader.
This entry was posted in Statistical Techniques. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Histograms

  1. Pingback: Bar Diagram | Rashid's Blog

  2. Pingback: Scales in Geography: An Overview and Simple Method of Constructing Scales | Rashid's Blog

  3. Pingback: Pie Chart | Rashid's Blog

  4. Pingback: Climograph | Rashid's Blog

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